OKI Printing Solutions, a company specializing in printing solutions, polled 100 weight loss club members to test a theory that health-conscious buyers are more likely to be drawn to foods in blue packaging. Were they right?

Yes. Survey results showed that 76% of those shown two brands of breakfast cereal, orange juice and a yogurt drink believed the the items offered in blue packaging to be the healthier choices.

In their press release, OKI Printing Solutions quoted color psychologist Angela Wright. “The 76 percent agreement rate comes as no surprise to me. Blue is not a natural food color, however it can be wisely used in the marketing of low-fat foods as it encourages people to eat less,” she said.“Blue is the color of the mind and evokes a sense of responsibility, tending to encourage us to be on our best behavior so unconsciously consumers believe the product is lower in fat than other brands,” she added.

Blue is the color of the mind and evokes a sense of responsibility, tending to encourage us to be on our best behavior so unconsciously consumers believe the product is lower in fat than other brands.

Angela Wright, Color Psychologist

Blue Packaging In The Dairy Aisle

Although there is not an agreed upon standard, all you have to do is take a walk into the grocery store to see many low fat products have blue packaging. From low-fat milk and yogurt to ice cream blue is the color that many, although not all, use to indicate that the product contains less fat.

Blue also indicates cold or cool so you'll also see it in the freezer case for zero calorie ice and not-so-low calorie frozen desserts so unfortunately the color is not always a reliable indicator of calories or fat content.

UPDATE: Blue packaging continues to indicate low fat while purple has become the color that is being used to indicate no fat products. Dannon Light 'n Fit product line is a good example of how this color is being used. Originally the packaging was white and light blue. With no fat becoming more important to customers they change to using purple for the zero fat offering within their product line to replace blue, which had become known to signify lower fat although not necessarily low fat.

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